Media Coverage 1/5/17

UC’s proposed tuition hikes dominated news. UCOP has emphasized that the hikes will only impact wealthier families, while critics have questioned the system’s swollen rank of administrators.

Tuition

1/4 – UC seeks 1st tuition hike since 2011; protests expected (SFC): UC Regents will vote on raising tuition for the first time since 2011, though in-state families making less than $150,000 would not see an increase, under the current plan. The income cutoff means about one-third of students would face a 2.5 percent hike. Out of state students can expect a hike of 5 percent.

1/5 – UC’s tuition increase: A case of funny math (SFGate): Asimov calls out UC for trying to fiddle with the optics of the proposed tuition hike by changing how it calculates tuition. Previously, fees were included in the tuition figure most often cited; recently, UC has separated the two.

1/6 – Editorial: UC tuition hikes? First justify your administrative bloat (SDUT): The editorial board calls out UC for its bloated administrative ranks, noting that administrators outnumber faculty and that CSU, by comparison, is running a much more svelte operation.

1/4 – Napolitano: UC quality not sustainable without tuition hike (SacBee): UC President Janet Napolitano told the SacBee: “We’re now hitting the point where we’re going to miss that sweet spot on quality – on really high graduation rates, on the kind of academic reputation that UC has. There’s only so many years you can go without a rate increase or a small tuition increase that doesn’t sacrifice a lot by way of quality. As much I’d like to say we can sustain this forever, we cannot.”

1/4 – UC proposes first tuition increase in six years for more faculty, courses and financial aid (LATimes): The increased tuition would fund financial aid and smaller classes, though student groups have protested the proposal.

Also see: Daily Bruin | Daily Cal | UCOP Statement

This & That

1/4 – UC president Napolitano says she wants UC Davis to expand into Sacramento (SacBee):  UC President Janet Napolitano says UC Davis’ planned expansion into Sacramento, which earlier was reported to have died with the resignation of Linda Katehi, is still on the table.

1/5 – Editorial: UC Davis, Sacramento make a promising team (SacBee): The Bee is happy the university still intends to expand into Sacramento–an example of old school newspaper boosterism at its purest.

1/1 – UC Davis dumped barrels of wine each year. Now it might sell for $80 a bottle (SacBee): A new law will allow UC Davis to sell student-produced wine.

1/4 – UCSD may build campus fire station (SDUT): Emergency response times are an issue in San Diego, especially on the UCSD campus.

 

Holiday Season Media Coverage

Athletics

12/23 – Chancellor Nicholas Dirks gives Task Force on Intercollegiate Athletics more time to determine Cal’s athletic future (BearTerritory): A task force looking into the financial stability of Cal’s sports teams will not meet its intended deadline for proposing reforms.

Read Dirks’ full letter here.

12/16 – Commentary: Cutting Cal rugby remains wrong answer (EBT): Rugby could be a casualty of the athletic task force.

12/23 – Former UC Berkeley athletic director says she was overruled on field hockey space decision (DailyCal): There are disputed accounts of who supported turning Cal’s field hockey venue into a multi-purpose field, a transformation that has led to a Title IX investigation.

Housing

12/12 – UC Berkeley overcrowding: Students studying in San Francisco, living at Mills College (SJMN):

12/11 – Homework, but no home: How Bay Area housing costs affect some UC Berkeley students (SacBee): A new Homeless Students Union at Berkeley is confronting a growing issue on campus, but the school lacks official data on the scope of the problem.
Katehi
11/22 – UC Davis drops big plan for Sacramento with Katehi’s departure (SacBee): A plan to build a campus for the World Food Center in Sacramento has died with the departure of Katehi.
12/14 – Hundreds vie for UC Davis top job (SacBee): UC Davis has reviewed 525 applicants hoping to lead the campus after the tumultuous tenure of Linda Katehi ended in controversy.
Labor
Elsewhere
12/13 – Field of Dreams: Public Higher Education in the United States (LARB): A review of The Great Mistake: How we wrecked public universities and how we can fix them.

12/24 – Editorial: Montgomery, On UCSC’s outrageous mass destruction of books (SJMN): At UCSC, around 80,000 volumes were destroyed or moved to storage facilities, a move undertaken with no faculty input.

12/23 – UC Berkeley braces for Breitbart provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos (SJMN): The noted conservative “troll” was invited to campus by College Republicans, but the school is asking the student group to help foot the security bill, which could run $10,000.

12/21 – UC Regents Win Cancer Drug Licensing Ruling (IHE): The ruling should net the system $32 million.

12/22 – Which means what, exactly? (UCLA faculty blog): Facebook announces a new research collaboration with a number of schools, including Berkeley and UCSF, intended to generate “new revenue streams” in virtual reality and AI. Not much more information is out there…

12/19 – California freshman applications to UC continue record-breaking climb (UCOP): In-state applications to the UC system climbed, while out-of-state and international applications declined.

Media Coverage 12/02/16

UC received national attention for announcing it intends to oppose any action the Trump administration may take to deport Dreamers or register Muslim citizens. Elsewhere, sexual misconduct by senior members of the UC community continued to be an issue with previously disgraced Regent Pattiz facing fallout over leaked audio. Elsewhere, Nancy Pelosi has weighed in on UCSF’s outsourcing scheme.

12/1 -UC won’t assist federal agents in immigration actions against students (LATimes): UC has announced it will not cooperate–sans a court order–with efforts to deport undocumented students or to create a registry of citizens based on religion or race. About 3,700 students have in-state tuition under a state law that allows undocumented students to be treated as California residents.

11/30 – Op-Ed: The Truth About Young Immigrants and DACA (NYT): UC President Janet Napolitano argues that DACA reflects a lawful use of prosecutorial discretion and should be left unchanged by the Trump administration. I’m honestly a bit puzzles by how little this op-ed says.

12/2 – The Fight for a Field (DailyCal): After being displaced from their field to accommodate a new football facility, Cal’s field hockey team has languished without a proper home field. Both federal and campus Title IX investigations are ongoing, while the relocation costs have topped $7.2 million and handle litigation.

12/2 – How top U.S. colleges hooked up with controversial Chinese companies (Reuters): UC Berkeley is among a number of elite schools that has had admissions counselors flown to China to meet with students who have paid for the help of an education consultant.

11/27 – Leaked audio reveals additional lewd comments from UC Regent Norman Pattiz (DailyCal): Leaked audio reveals Regent Norman Pattiz made additional lewd comments at his place of work.

11/30 – Editorial: UC Regent Norman Pattiz needs to resign from position (DailyBruin): The editorial is fairly straightforward:

If you want a porn connoisseur making decisions about our school’s academic, administrative and yes, sexual harassment policies, then by all means, Pattiz should remain a regent. But if he has any remaining respect for himself and the institution he works for, he must resign.

11/29 – Search begins for permanent lead on UC Berkeley sexual misconduct cases (DailyCal): Amid a number of sexual harassment scandals, UC is moving to hire its first (non-interim) lead on campus sexual violence and sexual harassment cases.

11/21 – Call for Due Process for Accused Berkeley Professor (IHE): A group of current and former students are asking the university to withhold judgment on Nezar AlSayyad, who has been accused of sexually harassing a student, until an investigation is complete. The names of the students involved in the petition are not being publicly released.

11/23 – Pelosi says UC IT workers are in ‘untenable position’ (ComputerWorld): House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has waded into a debate over UCSF’s plan to offshore some IT services asking the university to reverse course.

Media Coverage 11/18/16

Another renowned member of UC Berkeley’s faculty has been found to have sexually harassed a student. Elsewhere, UC Regents are considering a tuition hike, though the political climate stemming from last summer’s audit may make it hard to pass.

Nezar AlSayyad

11/13 – Investigation: UC Berkeley professor sexually harassed student (SFChronicle): In this case, best to let the reporting speak for itself:

A renowned Middle East scholar and architecture professor at UC Berkeley spent months ingratiating himself with a graduate student before placing his hand on her upper thigh, proposing they become “close friends” and suggesting they go to Las Vegas, a campus investigation has found. / Nezar AlSayyad, an internationally recognized scholar and a frequent public voice on global issues, is the latest prominent faculty member at UC Berkeley found to have sexually harassed a student or colleague in violation of University of California rules, The Chronicle has learned. / A five-month investigation completed in October upheld nearly all of the student’s allegations. The 52-page report obtained by The Chronicle found that AlSayyad’s behavior became increasingly personal from 2012 to 2014, with frequent social invitations and hugs, as he sought to position himself as the student’s protector and make her beholden to him

11/15 – UC Berkeley students demand professor’s suspension (SFGate): Students have petitioned for AlSayyad’s firing.

See commentary 11/17 – Whom Does Secrecy Protect? (IHE)

Tuition

11/18 – UC tuition increase? Not after this year’s damning audit (SDUT): UC is making the case for its first tuition increase — on the scale of 2.5 to 3.1 percent — in six years, while CSU eyes a 5 percent hike. However, the articles questions whether the state’s audit of UC over the summer will make make it unlikely for the hike to be carried out.

11/18 – UC students disrupt regents’ meeting with protests against possible tuition hike (LATimes): As UC Regents met to discuss tuition hikes, about 80 student protestors demonstrated, momentarily derailing the meeting until police cleared the room.

Also see SJMN

Elsewhere in harassment news

11/17 – UC Regent’s Offensive Comments Lead To New Harassment Policy (AP): The UC Regents created new rules governing sexual harassment in response to comments Regent Norman Pattiz made to a woman at his place of work. Pattiz remains on the board. Under the new rules, all regents are required to take UC’s sexual harassment training.

Also see 11/9 – “UC regent’s breast comments prompt proposal for tighter rules on sexual harassment” (LATimes)

11/17 – Ex-UC dean accused of harassment drops suit against university (SFGate): Former UC Berkeley Law Dean Sujit Choudhry has dropped his lawsuit claiming racial bias against the university. The academic senate is set to hold a hearing to consider his job status.

Labor

11/16 – University of California workers strike for higher wages (KQED): Skilled trade workers at UC San Diego and UCLA were set to strike for higher wages.

11/16 – UCSF workers claim discrimination in IT outsourcing (SJMN): Ten UCSF employees fired as part of an outsourcing move are alleging they were fired due to their age and nationality (American).

Less Controversial

11/18 – UCD presents its housing plans to UC regents (DavisEnt): UC Davis aims to increase the portion of students living on campus from 35 to 40 percent as town-gown relationships begin to strain.

Media Coverage 11/04/16

UC news this past week was dominated by reports of disgusting behavior by Regent Norman Pattiz, chairman of the Courtside Entertainment Group.

UC News

11/2 – UC regent apologizes for ‘inappropriate’ comments about women’s breasts (LATimes): Pattiz apologized for asking to hold the breasts of a  woman taping a bra commercial at Pattiz’s company. UC did not issue a statement. The Times dug up other accusations of inappropriate workplace harassment from Pattiz.

More: DailyCal | SFGate

11/3 – After pink slips, UCSF tech workers train their foreign replacements (SJMN): A $50 million outsourcing deal with an Indian company has resulted in 80 tech workers losing their jobs. UCSF says it will save $30 million over five years. U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren asked Napolitano to reverse the plan and questioned the legality of using H-1B visas to bring in some Indian workers on-site. Questions about patient data privacy have also been raised.

10/31- Op-Ed: The University Of California’s Censor In Sheep’s Clothing (Forbes): A not very thoughtful critique of Napolitano’s recent op-ed in the Boston Globe. Essentially, the author worries trigger warnings and safe spaces harm free speech. He dismisses concerns about inclusion.

10/30 – Faculty, staff voice expectations for next UC Berkeley chancellor at listening sessions (DailyCal): A very nice photograph is attached to this story about a recent “listening session.” The article notes the back-and-forth between those who wish for a shortlist to be made public and those who feel such a move would harm the process.

11/2 – Anti-immigrant graffiti found at UC San Diego (SDUT): The election is Tuesday.

Elsewhere

11/2 – Virginia colleges told to brace for 7.5 percent cuts (RichmondTD): Virginia, home to two of the nation’s great public universities, has told its higher ed system to prepare for cuts. 

11/4 – Historic Fine for Penn State (IHE): The US Dept. of Education will fine PSU $2.4 million for failing to disclose crimes relating to its infamous child molestation scandal.

Media Coverage 10/28/16

News has been slow to appear, but a study from Occidental College received national attention for its discovery of widespread hunger among UC employees. Elsewhere, the SF Chronicle dug into the “Kafkaesque” situation surrounding Dirks’ personal trainer (no one transforms along the lines of Gregor Samsa) who has been on paid leave pending an investigation.

Hunger among UC employees

10/19 – California Today: For Some U.C. Workers, Skipping Meals to Make Ends Meet (NYT): A study found 45 percent of the system’s full-time administrative employees experience hunger. The study was conducted with support from the Teamsters union, which represents the workers. UC suggests the timing may be political, as the system is in labor negotiations.

10/17 – Seven in 10 UC workers struggle with food insecurity (LATimes): See the report in full from Occidental College.

UC News

10/17 – UC Berkeley chancellor’s personal trainer in ‘Kafkaesque’ tangle (SFChron): The former boss of a trainer being investigated by UCOP for offering Dirks free training lessons has, essentially, accused UCOP of wasting the system’s money and time.

According to his whistle-blower complaint, if there’s been any improper spending, it’s the more than $53,000 in salary and benefits that has been wasted these past six months keeping Wicks on the payroll but not allowing him to work.

10/25 – Giving cash to Clinton’s campaign? Good chance you work for University of California (SacBee): Private donations by UC employees to the Clinton campaign led all such blocks, followed closely by Alphabet (Google).

10/20 – State lawmakers discuss future of higher education at campus forum Tuesday (DailyCal): At an event organized by the CSHE, Carol Christ asked lawmakers if a predictable formula for tuition increases would be palatable in Sacramento. She received a terse reply:
“I would think that would be perfectly reasonable,”  Liu, the District 25 senator, said at the forum. “In fact, we did carry a piece of legislation when I was in the lower house, (but) actually the UCs opposed it. They didn’t want anything that was gradual, predictable or affordable. They wanted do it on their own.”

10/24 – Campus leadership prompted vice chancellor Bob Lalanne’s resignation (DailyCal): Former VC for real estate had his position terminated and declined to take another post, citing tumult within the admin ranks.

Elsewhere in higher ed
10/26 – Tuition bills up, but borrowing down (Politico): Average in-state tuition rose about 2.4 percent, but borrowing is down to $106.8 billion, off from a peak of $124.2 billion in 2011.

See the College Board’s new report on pricing, “Trends in College Pricing 2016.”

10/24 – This photo essay shows what it really means to be adjunct faculty (WaPo): A collection of photographs from Ithaca College displays the plight of adjunct faculty members.

Media Coverage 10/14/16

The LA Times took a close look at Sujit Choudhry’s lawsuit against UC, and a few prominent labor lawyers think he may have a case. Elsewhere, UC’s $100 billion man departed and a firm accused of cheating the college admissions process was linked to UC.

UC News

10/11 – UC’s extraordinary legal battle with ex-Berkeley law school dean (LATimes):  Former Law Dean Sujit Choudhry is suing the UC system, arguing he is being treated more harshly than his white peers after he was forced to step down for sexual harassment. The suit claims Napolitano’s decision to increase his punishment was intended to “try to improve the university’s image, as well as her own.”

10/10 – Private Equity Chief at University of California Fund Departs (Bloomberg): Timothy Recker, who joined the system in 2007, was responsible for nearly $100 billion in assets. 

8/14 -How a Chinese company bought access to admissions officers at top U.S. colleges (Reuters): UC Berkeley admissions officials are noted for accepting plane tickets to attend a conference hosted by a Chinese firm accused of helping students cheat on college applications

10/13 – Campus Disabled Students’ Program has been noncompliant with state regulations for years (DailyCal): A program that helps students with disabilities adjust to college life will shut down at Berkeley after it was discovered the state-funded program was out of compliance with state rules.

10/13 – Online and Homegrown (IHE): California’s community college system is experimenting with a program whereby students can register for online classes hosted at other campuses should enrollment reach capacity at their home institution.

Elsewhere in higher ed

10/6 – University bureaucracies grew 15 percent during the recession, even as budgets were cut and tuition increased (Hechinger): A deep dive into the growing bureaucracies on college campuses and efforts to curtail the growth, often through consolidation under central services schemes.